Located   between   Hurley   and   Silver   City   New   Mexico,   Fort   Bayard   was   once   the   home   to   Apache   Native   Americans,   many   military   families,   the   first   Buffalo   Soldiers   and   a   tuberculosis hospital.   It   was   originally   established   in   1865   to   protect   early   settlers   and   miners   along   the   Apache Trail and then developed into regular army units in 1866.     In   1899,   Fort   Bayard   Army   Post   became   a   hospital   for   patients   with   T.B.,   and   finally,   around   1922,   ownership   of   the   hopsital   was   transferred   under   the   Veterans   Administration. 
       
     
  Fort   Bayard   closed   its   doors   in   2010,   leaving   the   once   full   of   life   facility   to   become desolate and run down.  Although   declared   a   national   historic   landmark   in   2004,   the   locally   formed   “Fort   Bayard   Historic Preservation Society” is currently seeking to restore the fort. 
       
     
ELISA FT BAYARD AUG 8 2013-4.jpg
       
     
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ELISA FT BAYARD AUG 8 2013-1.jpg
       
     
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  In   1899,   surgeon   George   M.   Stemberg   heavily   renovated   the   post   into   an   infirmary   for   bed-ridden U.S. Army officers with tuberculosis.   Throughout   the   next   decade,   Fort   Bayard   saw   many   changes,   particularly   during   the   time of commanding officer Major Private George E. Bushnell.     Dr.   Bushnell   is   credited   for   much   of   the   sanatorium’s   success.   His   research   on   T.   B.   offered the best chance for recovery at that time. 
       
     
  In   1922,   officials   at   both   the   Treasury   Department   and   Veterans   Bureau   announced   an   expansion   of   the   facility   to   accommodate   more   patients   and   add   residential   quarters   for   employees.     By   1965,   the   State   of   New   Mexico   took   over   responsibility   of   the   hospital   using   it   as   a   long-term care center for military veterans. 
       
     
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  Since   Fort   Bayard   closed   its   doors   in   2010,   many   of   the   81   buildings,   including   the   hospital,   have   been   plagued   with   vandalism   and   deterioration.   Currently,   The   Fort   Bayard   Preservation   Development   Coalition,   Members   of   the   Fort   Bayard   Historic   Society,   and   local   residents   are   struggling   to   rebuild   and   return   the   history   that   once   was the heart of the post. 
       
     
  “Fort   Bayard   is   near   and   dear   to   my   heart   because   of   so   many   people   that   lived   and   worked   and   gave   their   lives   for   other   people   and   they   have   stories   that   need   to   be   told.”     -Cecilia Bell,   President of The Fort Bayard Historic Society 
       
     
  “We would like for the buildings that are left to be preserved as a monument for those   who have served here both as patients, as workers, as volunteers, or who have had   family that have been here in the post.”     -John Bell,   Member of the Fort Bayard Historic Society 
       
     
  “We   were   all   friends,   and   we   took   care   of   each   other;   there   was   a   bond   here   that   I’d   hate for us to lose.”     -Sharon Hoagland Gonzalez, Former resident of Fort Bayard 
       
     
  “Until   there   is   new   ownership,   you   can   see   there   is   so   much   deterioration   and   so   much   work   needed   --   mowing,   cutting   the   dead   trees   down,   and   getting   these   buildings   at   least   a   better   face lift.”     -Kathryn   Brown,   Member   of   the   Fort   Bayard   Preservation   Development Coalition 
       
     
  “Everybody   is   dedicated   to   keeping   the   history   --   no   question.   That   is   a   big   thing;   we   are   very   positive   that   the   possible   buyer   understands   where   we   are   coming   from   as   they   progress   along   with   the   State.”     -Ansel   Walters,   President   of   the   Fort   Bayard   Preservation   Development Coalition 
       
     
  “This   was   the   major   head   quarters   for   the   Ninth   Calvary   Buffalo   Soldiers.   They   did   operations   out   of   here   you   wouldn’t   believe,   and   you   just   feel   these   guys...they   are   still   here;   sometimes,   it   gets   to   me,   and we just can’t let this go.”     -William ‘Bill” McCurtis
       
     
  While concerned citizens strive to secure a historically supportive future for the post,   some of that history is kept alive through events such as Fort Bayard Days and   traditional reenactments. It is vital to those involved that the memories, the people,   and their stories are told and honored. 
       
     
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Fort Bayard, New Mexico Editorial

Fort Bayard, New Mexico is in risk of slipping away into oblivion.  Without proper funding and support what's left of Fort Bayard will be forever lost in American History.  

Our goal through our Fort Bayard Project is to raise awareness of the long and rich history and to preserve the area for generations to come.

  Located   between   Hurley   and   Silver   City   New   Mexico,   Fort   Bayard   was   once   the   home   to   Apache   Native   Americans,   many   military   families,   the   first   Buffalo   Soldiers   and   a   tuberculosis hospital.   It   was   originally   established   in   1865   to   protect   early   settlers   and   miners   along   the   Apache Trail and then developed into regular army units in 1866.     In   1899,   Fort   Bayard   Army   Post   became   a   hospital   for   patients   with   T.B.,   and   finally,   around   1922,   ownership   of   the   hopsital   was   transferred   under   the   Veterans   Administration. 
       
     

Located between Hurley and Silver City New Mexico, Fort Bayard was once the home to Apache Native Americans, many military families, the first Buffalo Soldiers and a tuberculosis hospital.
It was originally established in 1865 to protect early settlers and miners along the Apache Trail and then developed into regular army units in 1866.

In 1899, Fort Bayard Army Post became a hospital for patients with T.B., and finally, around 1922, ownership of the hopsital was transferred under the Veterans Administration. 

  Fort   Bayard   closed   its   doors   in   2010,   leaving   the   once   full   of   life   facility   to   become desolate and run down.  Although   declared   a   national   historic   landmark   in   2004,   the   locally   formed   “Fort   Bayard   Historic Preservation Society” is currently seeking to restore the fort. 
       
     

Fort Bayard closed its doors in 2010, leaving the once full of life facility to become desolate and run down.  Although declared a national historic landmark in 2004, the locally formed “Fort Bayard Historic Preservation Society” is currently seeking to restore the fort. 

ELISA FT BAYARD AUG 8 2013-4.jpg
       
     
ELISA FT BAYARD AUG 8 2013-5.jpg
       
     
ELISA FT BAYARD AUG 8 2013-1.jpg
       
     
FT BAYARD AUG 8 2013-2.jpg
       
     
  In   1899,   surgeon   George   M.   Stemberg   heavily   renovated   the   post   into   an   infirmary   for   bed-ridden U.S. Army officers with tuberculosis.   Throughout   the   next   decade,   Fort   Bayard   saw   many   changes,   particularly   during   the   time of commanding officer Major Private George E. Bushnell.     Dr.   Bushnell   is   credited   for   much   of   the   sanatorium’s   success.   His   research   on   T.   B.   offered the best chance for recovery at that time. 
       
     

In 1899, surgeon George M. Stemberg heavily renovated the post into an infirmary for bed-ridden U.S. Army officers with tuberculosis.
Throughout the next decade, Fort Bayard saw many changes, particularly during the time of commanding officer Major Private George E. Bushnell.

Dr. Bushnell is credited for much of the sanatorium’s success. His research on T. B. offered the best chance for recovery at that time. 

  In   1922,   officials   at   both   the   Treasury   Department   and   Veterans   Bureau   announced   an   expansion   of   the   facility   to   accommodate   more   patients   and   add   residential   quarters   for   employees.     By   1965,   the   State   of   New   Mexico   took   over   responsibility   of   the   hospital   using   it   as   a   long-term care center for military veterans. 
       
     

In 1922, officials at both the Treasury Department and Veterans Bureau announced an expansion of the facility to accommodate more patients and add residential quarters for employees. 

By 1965, the State of New Mexico took over responsibility of the hospital using it as a long-term care center for military veterans. 

FINALS REDUX WEB-2.jpg
       
     
  Since   Fort   Bayard   closed   its   doors   in   2010,   many   of   the   81   buildings,   including   the   hospital,   have   been   plagued   with   vandalism   and   deterioration.   Currently,   The   Fort   Bayard   Preservation   Development   Coalition,   Members   of   the   Fort   Bayard   Historic   Society,   and   local   residents   are   struggling   to   rebuild   and   return   the   history   that   once   was the heart of the post. 
       
     

Since Fort Bayard closed its doors in 2010, many of the 81 buildings, including the hospital, have been plagued with vandalism and deterioration. Currently, The Fort Bayard Preservation Development Coalition, Members of the Fort Bayard Historic Society, and local residents are struggling to rebuild and return the history that once was the heart of the post. 

  “Fort   Bayard   is   near   and   dear   to   my   heart   because   of   so   many   people   that   lived   and   worked   and   gave   their   lives   for   other   people   and   they   have   stories   that   need   to   be   told.”     -Cecilia Bell,   President of The Fort Bayard Historic Society 
       
     

“Fort Bayard is near and dear to my heart because of so many people that lived and worked and gave their lives for other people and they have stories that need to be told.” 

-Cecilia Bell,
President of The Fort Bayard Historic Society 

  “We would like for the buildings that are left to be preserved as a monument for those   who have served here both as patients, as workers, as volunteers, or who have had   family that have been here in the post.”     -John Bell,   Member of the Fort Bayard Historic Society 
       
     

“We would like for the buildings that are left to be preserved as a monument for those who have served here both as patients, as workers, as volunteers, or who have had family that have been here in the post.” 

-John Bell,
Member of the Fort Bayard Historic Society 

  “We   were   all   friends,   and   we   took   care   of   each   other;   there   was   a   bond   here   that   I’d   hate for us to lose.”     -Sharon Hoagland Gonzalez, Former resident of Fort Bayard 
       
     

“We were all friends, and we took care of each other; there was a bond here that I’d hate for us to lose.” 

-Sharon Hoagland Gonzalez, Former resident of Fort Bayard 

  “Until   there   is   new   ownership,   you   can   see   there   is   so   much   deterioration   and   so   much   work   needed   --   mowing,   cutting   the   dead   trees   down,   and   getting   these   buildings   at   least   a   better   face lift.”     -Kathryn   Brown,   Member   of   the   Fort   Bayard   Preservation   Development Coalition 
       
     

“Until there is new ownership, you can see there is so much deterioration and so much work needed -- mowing, cutting the dead trees down, and getting these buildings at least a better face lift.”

-Kathryn Brown, Member of the Fort Bayard Preservation Development Coalition 

  “Everybody   is   dedicated   to   keeping   the   history   --   no   question.   That   is   a   big   thing;   we   are   very   positive   that   the   possible   buyer   understands   where   we   are   coming   from   as   they   progress   along   with   the   State.”     -Ansel   Walters,   President   of   the   Fort   Bayard   Preservation   Development Coalition 
       
     

“Everybody is dedicated to keeping the history -- no question. That is a big thing; we are very positive that the possible buyer understands where we are coming from as they progress along with the State.” 

-Ansel Walters, President of the Fort Bayard Preservation Development Coalition 

  “This   was   the   major   head   quarters   for   the   Ninth   Calvary   Buffalo   Soldiers.   They   did   operations   out   of   here   you   wouldn’t   believe,   and   you   just   feel   these   guys...they   are   still   here;   sometimes,   it   gets   to   me,   and we just can’t let this go.”     -William ‘Bill” McCurtis
       
     

“This was the major head quarters for the Ninth Calvary Buffalo Soldiers. They did operations out of here you wouldn’t believe, and you just feel these guys...they are still here; sometimes, it gets to me, and we just can’t let this go.”

-William ‘Bill” McCurtis

  While concerned citizens strive to secure a historically supportive future for the post,   some of that history is kept alive through events such as Fort Bayard Days and   traditional reenactments. It is vital to those involved that the memories, the people,   and their stories are told and honored. 
       
     

While concerned citizens strive to secure a historically supportive future for the post, some of that history is kept alive through events such as Fort Bayard Days and traditional reenactments. It is vital to those involved that the memories, the people, and their stories are told and honored. 

FORT BAYARD SEPT 21-12.jpg
       
     
FORT BAYARD SEPT 21-14.jpg